Massey Discussion Forums > Massey Talk > Wallis Tractors
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RE:Wallis Tractors

John,

I am not very familiar with the Aumann online auctions so I just put a $2,100.00 bid on this tractor and was watching it between seeding my oats in the back field. Every time I came in to fill the grain drill I would check the auction and it was really dragging out for a long time. I would drain the full seed box on my MH 20 grain drill and they would only have sold about 10 tractors. When I got back the 5th time I just missed seeing this tractor sell by four tractors. I would have bid a lot more but after talking with the people at Aumann's shipping department they quoted me $3,650.00 to ship it to my place. I've been so busy here I didn't think I could get away to go retrieve it myself and if I did it would be about a 5-6 day deal plus gas and motels.

I believe this tractor never left the factory as an Industrial I'm thinking they sent it out as a regular farm tractor, I would have loved to have this in my collection but the only thing indicating it was an Industrial is the rear housing and the Serial # and Engine # so if a guy was to put it back to the way it should be it would take a lot of ingenuity.

I do hope someone has a long talk with the now owner and persuades him not to knock this one in the head for parts.....

Joe

RE:Wallis Tractors

Joe,

I have just been catching up on the past couple of weeks discussion and photo's on here whilst I have been a bit busy.

Well done everyone involved for getting the detailed photo's of this tractor in Oregon, like everyone else I am astounded that such a tractor with these industrial attributes has turned up, like you have all said I would think it was using up the "left overs" which did not sell and turning them into an agricultural spec tractor with potential of a sale.

I was sorry to hear you did not get it to add to your collection Joe, I sincerely hope Alan has some discussion with the new owner and points him in the right direction for the long term future of this 12-20.
I am sure there are plenty of other Challenger parts tractors out there to help him with his restoration project.

I am sure someone with some engineering skills and determination it could be a very interesting project for the re-creation of a 12-20 Industrial from this tractor.

Malcolm.









Malcolm

RE:Wallis Tractors

I was wondering of anyone got photos of the gear lever and gear gate on that industrial 12-20.  The specifications say that it has four forward gears so it ought to have a different gate arrangement to that on an agricultural 12-20.

John

RE:Wallis Tractors

Malcolm,

You inquired about the Wallis 20-30 Orchard on the front page, As of now this is the only one known to exist as far as I know. The tractor is owned by Tom and he has gone through it pretty Thurley and fixed anything it needed. After he got it running for the first time it seemed to not quite sound like a Wallis should so he tore it all apart again and found the timing mark was marked wrong from the factory now as you can hear on the second run it sounds more like a Wallis should. I believe all he has left to do is switch all four tires as he is not happy with the look of the tires that are on it now. Here are a couple surgery pictures from the operating room, and the first and second run video "Listen to the Difference" it is noticeable to the trained Wallis ear...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GmqplX3zX34

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yc500jhIYF0

Joe
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RE:Wallis Tractors

Many thanks for the up-date and good photo's Joe,

Interesting to see the mechanical restoration of this rare tractor and hear it run both before and after the timing was sorted. I bet the original owner was never satisfied with his tractor or maybe he never knew any different at the time. That just shows the benefits of progression.


Now Tom will have to get his 12-20 Orchard finished and get them standing side by side.

Malcolm.
Malcolm

RE:Wallis Tractors

Malcolm & Tom Tague,

Here is one that will leave you scratching your head.... I know you have heard of Wide Axel 44s 444s & such but have you ever heard of a Wide Axel Wallis??

Joe
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RE:Wallis Tractors

A very interesting find Joe, is your trailer wide enough to carry it ????

No I have never come across a "Wallis Wide Axle" before,  from the style of spade lug it looks to me like it could of worked somewhere like California ?? and possibly had some implement attached to the tractor as there looks to be a series of holes drilled in the top of the front axle on the left hand side only.

Do you have any further history and detail on the tractor??

When I looked a the first photo of the wide front axle it reminded me of the early Fordson with extended wide axle to accommodate the disc plough and allow the front wheel to run in the furrow and tractor up on the land, also seen some Case Cross motors with extended axles, but think both the Case and Fordson are wider one side than the other.
From the photo the Wallis looks to pivot in the centre of the wide axle.

Keep us posted,
Malcolm.
Malcolm

RE:Wallis Tractors

Howdy,  I had to go a long ways back to get to this topic, so we better say something.  Recently, Joe and I were visiting about the Wallis 15-25 dilemma. AKA the Model OK,  Some or most have the steering shaft that goes to the steering box on the front of the Tractor, where as some have the steering that is similar to an early 20-30.  It took me a few moments to remember, but I remember back in the Days of the Wild Harvest Show and Banquet, we were at Madison, South Dakota.  And during the daily Parade I had the great fortune to sit on the groud, under a shade tree with  Gene Schmidt.  In that hour and a half or so I learned more about the Wallis line than I thought there could be.  Gene explained to me how, as improvements were made they cold be utilized on earlier Models keeping them useable, unlike competitive companies.  Another topic discussed was the OK/OKO differences. Gene explained as the Wallis Line continued to evolve to the OK more modifacation were being made, one in particular was the Steering.  By changing to the newer style Steering,. which was introduced and continued on into the 20-30, this marked the end of the OK, and the15-25 was now called the OKO.  I do not now remember if there was a cutoff, and became this, or if Wallis made a few to test and follow in the field before changing completly.  Gene was truly a Wallis Authority and after all these years, the questions I have he could answer is greater than then. Hopefully this helps answer some questions.
    On another note, another topic Joe and I were discussing was the year the Wallis Cub Jr was introduced.  Joe and Tom had scoured all information and found nothing to date the introduction before 1917. Advertisements in Trade magazines confirm this.  I did however find a dating of sorts to this.  When Massey Harris purchased the J I Case Plow Works, with the Wallis line they made a Sales Booklet, including Testimonials, from owners of Wallis Tractors.  In this Brochure under Testimonials from Iowa, is one from my Great-Grandfatather E.H. Pace and his 1916 Wallis Cub Jr.  Serial 10056.  Sure makes you want to scratch your head.  As always we keep looking.  Well Happy Trails,  Tim Pace